Checklist

checklist is a type of informational job aid used to reduce failure by compensating for potential limits of human memory and attention It helps to ensure consistency and completeness in carrying out a task. A basic example is the “to do list.” A more advanced checklist would be a schedule, which lays out tasks to be done according to time of day or other factors. A primary task in checklist is documentation of the task and auditing against the documentation.

Task management is the process of managing a task through its life cycle. It involves planning, testing, tracking and reporting. Task management can help either individuals achieve goals, or groups of individuals collaborate and share knowledge for the accomplishment of collective goals. Tasks are also differentiated by complexity, from low to high.

Effective task management requires managing all aspects of a task, including its status, priority, time, human and financial resources assignments, recurrency, notifications and so on. These can be lumped together broadly into the basic activities of task management.

Managing multiple individual or team tasks may require specialised software, for example workflow or project management software In fact, many people believe that task management should serve as a foundation for project management activities.

Task management may form part of project management and process management and can serve as the foundation for efficient workflow in an organisation. Project managers adhering to task-oriented management have a detailed and up-to-date project schedule, and are usually good at directing team members and moving the project forward.

Task life cycle

The status of tasks can be described by the following states:

  • Ready
  • Assigned
  • Terminated
  • Expired
  • Forwarded
  • Finished
  • Failed

The following state machine diagram describes different states of a task over its life cycle. This diagram is referenced from IBM.

Activities supported by tasks

As a discipline, task management embraces several key activities. Various conceptual breakdowns exist, and these, at a high-level, always include creative, functional, project, performance and service activities.

  • Creative activities pertain to task creation. In context, these should allow for task planning, brainstorming, creation, elaboration, clarification, organization, reduction, targeting and preliminary prioritization.
  • Functional activities pertain to personnel, sales, quality or other management areas, for the ultimate purpose of ensuring production of final goods and services for delivery to customers. In context these should allow for planning, reporting, tracking, prioritizing, configuring, delegating, and managing of tasks.
  • Project activities pertain to planning and time and costs reporting. These can encompass multiple functional activities but are always greater and more purposeful than the sum of its parts. In context project activities should allow for project task breakdown, task allocation, inventory across projects, and concurrent access to task databases.
  • Service activities pertain to client and internal company services provision, including customer relationship management and knowledge management. In context these should allow for file attachment and links to tasks, document management, access rights management, inventory of client & employee records, orders & calls management, and annotating tasks.
  • Performance activities pertain to tracking performance and fulfillment of assigned tasks. In context these should allow for tracking by time, cost control, stakeholders and priority; charts, exportable reports, status updates, deadline adjustments, and activity logging.
  • Report activities pertain to the presentation of information regarding the other five activities listed, including graphical display.

Task management software

Task management software tools abound in the marketplace. Some are free; others exist for enterprise-wide deployment purposes. Some boast enterprise-wide task creation, visualization and notification capabilities – among others – scalable to small, medium and Fortune 100 size companies, from individual projects to ongoing corporate task management.

  • Task creation encompasses collaborative capabilities for turning ideas into actions (tasks). Includes activities involved before setting tasks, particularly patterns of collaboration involving planning
  • Task visualization encompasses presentation of tasks, most often through time and list forms. Priority visualization encompasses classification (e.g., budget, time, stakeholder) and mechanism (e.g., color code or text). Calendaring covers scheduling (e.g., availability, meetings, appointments and other potential conflicts) and notifications.
  • Notifications encompass configurable settings for informing past, present and pending deadlines.
  • Assigning resources encompasses the ability to delegate tasks and tools to single or multiple people.
  • Compatibility encompasses the ability of a task management environment to connect to other systems, software and environments. It includes setting a structure and restrictions on communication going from the task management environment to other software, systems and environments.
  • Configurability encompasses ability to add, remove and manage functionality and usability in task management environments.
  • Scalability encompasses ability to perform a task properly when a change in the quantity of users is done to meet the specific task requirements.
  • Reporting encompasses presentation of information by displaying either in tabular or graphical display.

The onboarding process from start to finish with a new hire is critical, right from pre-boarding, the first day through the first month, to the successful completion of their first year. With an aim towards helping the new hire succeed and providing the guidance necessary for new hires to successfully integrate to the new workplace, we provide critical inputs that give a step-by-step guide and checklist for HR managers to manage this process.

The benefits of a sound onboarding process applies to not just the employee, but the manager and the company.

The costs and numbers involved in employee turnover makes sense only for managers and companies to look into the process of onboarding with more vigour. About 33% of new hires lookout for a new job within 6 months of joining. New hire cost averages around $65,000 and the learning curve to full productivity can take upto 5 months of full employment. It is estimated that even a $8/hour employee can result in a company around $3,500 in turnover costs, both direct and indirect. This makes developing and investing in a sound onboarding process imperative.

Research and experience point out that on an average an employee takes upto 90 days to prove himself in a new position. People are very excited and quite vulnerable when they take new jobs, so it’s a time in which you can have a big impact,” Michael Watkins, author of the bestselling book, The First 90 Days. “Often the people who get the least attention are those making internal moves,” says Watkins, but those transitions, “can be terribly challenging.” Here’s a guideline to helps you build and develop your onboarding process within these first and crucial 90 days

 

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